The Revolution Will Not Be Fertilized

Permaculture for the weary civilized soul
I am inoculating a log with oyster mushroom mycelium.  This is a hickory (so I am told, this may be false) that fell in a recent storm.  A neighbor helped by cutting the fell tree into logs and cutting out the chunks with his chainsaw.  I inoculated 4 decent sized logs.  These logs could ideally produce mushrooms for many years and  produce as much weight in mushrooms as the log weighs.Oyster mushrooms are one of the most aggressive growing and good tasting mushrooms out there.  I previously bought some mycelium and inoculated waste coffee grounds.  After that I threw some of the coffee grounds into some wet down shredded paper.  That shredded paper is what I am packing into the slices in the log.  The mycelium “ran” like this.  Kit from Fungi Perfecti > free starbucks coffee grounds > shredded paper > logs fallen in stormTo inoculate these logs we cut a chunk out like a pie slice and packed the paper spawn into the crevices.  This will be covered with some plastic wrap and stored in a moist and shady place until the whole log is dominated by oyster mycelium.  Once the logs are covered in mycelium they will be buried in the soil a few inches and this will keep them moist.   If you want to do this you have to use freshly fallen and cut logs.  I decided to do this like this based on what I read in Mycelium Running and Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture.  I highly recommend these books and there is also lots of good (and bad) info about growing oyster mushrooms free on the internet.  My experience has shown me that oysters are pretty fool-proof.  It is an awesome way to convert waste products to food and offers a high amount of potential for re-use of urban and industrial waste.

I am inoculating a log with oyster mushroom mycelium.  This is a hickory (so I am told, this may be false) that fell in a recent storm.  A neighbor helped by cutting the fell tree into logs and cutting out the chunks with his chainsaw.  I inoculated 4 decent sized logs.  These logs could ideally produce mushrooms for many years and  produce as much weight in mushrooms as the log weighs.

Oyster mushrooms are one of the most aggressive growing and good tasting mushrooms out there.  I previously bought some mycelium and inoculated waste coffee grounds.  After that I threw some of the coffee grounds into some wet down shredded paper.  That shredded paper is what I am packing into the slices in the log.  The mycelium “ran” like this.  Kit from Fungi Perfecti > free starbucks coffee grounds > shredded paper > logs fallen in storm

To inoculate these logs we cut a chunk out like a pie slice and packed the paper spawn into the crevices.  This will be covered with some plastic wrap and stored in a moist and shady place until the whole log is dominated by oyster mycelium.  Once the logs are covered in mycelium they will be buried in the soil a few inches and this will keep them moist.  

 If you want to do this you have to use freshly fallen and cut logs.  I decided to do this like this based on what I read in Mycelium Running and Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture.  I highly recommend these books and there is also lots of good (and bad) info about growing oyster mushrooms free on the internet.  My experience has shown me that oysters are pretty fool-proof.  It is an awesome way to convert waste products to food and offers a high amount of potential for re-use of urban and industrial waste.

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